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1. Type C esophageal atresia

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Figure 34-1

Type C esophageal atresia.

Contrast study of a 2-week-old infant to determine the length of the atretic segment. A. Contrast fills a blind-ending dilated esophageal pouch (arrow) in the upper portion of the chest. There is rightward deviation of the trachea. B. Contrast injected through a gastrostomy tube refluxes into the distal esophageal segment and passes via a fistula into the distal portion of the trachea.

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2. Esophageal atresia type D

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Figure 34-2

Esophageal atresia type D.

A lateral esophagram image shows a dilated upper esophageal pouch that communicates via a fistula with the trachea (upper arrow). A second thin fistula (lower arrow) extends from the inferior aspect of the trachea into the distal segment of the esophagus.

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3. Esophageal atresia

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Figure 34-3

Esophageal atresia.

A chest radiograph of a newborn infant shows looping of a feeding tube in the distended upper thoracic portion of the esophagus. There is rightward deviation of the trachea. There are multiple vertebral anomalies.

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4. Esophageal atresia type A

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Figure 34-4

Esophageal atresia type A.

A. A radiograph of a 1-day-old infant shows a gasless abdomen. A tube is present in the obstructed esophagus. B. A retrograde esophagram at 2 months of age shows a short, blind-ending distal esophageal segment (lower arrow) that does not communicate with the tracheobronchial tree. A tube indicates the level of the upper esophageal pouch (upper arrow).

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5. Esophageal atresia

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Figure 34-5

Esophageal atresia.

A radiograph of a 31-week gestational age newborn infant shows a tube in an air-filled upper esophageal pouch (arrow). There is prominent bowel gas in the abdomen due to passage via a distal fistula (type C lesion). Cardiomegaly is present, due to a ventricular septal defect (VSD) and atrial septal defect (ASD).

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6. Type E (H-type) tracheoesophageal fistula

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Figure 34-6

Type E (H-type) tracheoesophageal fistula.

A lateral esophagram image shows a contrast-opacified thin tract (arrow) extending between the esophagus and the trachea.

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7. Type A esophageal atresia

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Figure 34-7

Type A esophageal atresia.

There is no tracheoesophageal fistula in this infant. Tubes in the proximal and distal portions of the esophagus (arrows) define ...

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