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1. Omphalocele

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Figure 39-1

Omphalocele.

An abdominal radiograph of a newborn shows a large extraabdominal mass that contains normal-caliber gas-filled intestine. The surrounding membrane of the omphalocele results in a smooth appearance at the margin of the mass.

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2. Gastroschisis

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Figure 39-2

Gastroschisis.

An abdominal radiograph of a newborn shows multiple herniated loops of dilated fluid-filled intestine. There is no covering membrane.

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3. Omphalomesenteric duct fistula

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Figure 39-3

Omphalomesenteric duct fistula.

A lateral image of an umbilical fistulogram shows contrast opacification of the small intestine.

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4. Urachal sinus

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Figure 39-4

Urachal sinus.

A. A longitudinal sonographic image of a 45-day-old infant with drainage of serous fluid from the umbilicus shows a hypoechoic structure (arrows) extending toward the dome of the bladder (B). B. Contrast injection shows lack of communication of the sinus with the bladder.

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5. Epigastric hernia

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Figure 39-5

Epigastric hernia.

An axial CT image shows herniation of gas-containing intestine through a small midline fascial defect.

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6. Umbilical hernia

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Figure 39-6

Umbilical hernia.

A longitudinal sonographic image of a 1-month-old infant shows extension of echogenic omentum and collapsed intestine through an enlarged umbilical ring.

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7. Bilateral inguinal hernias

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Figure 39-7

Bilateral inguinal hernias.

An abdominal radiograph of a 3-month-old boy shows soft tissue prominence in the inguinal regions (arrows). Gas from herniated bowel is visible in the scrotum and in the left inguinal region.

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8. Indirect inguinal hernia

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Figure 39-8

Indirect inguinal hernia.

A longitudinal sonographic image of a 2-month-old boy with scrotal fullness shows herniation of intestine (arrows) through the internal inguinal ring into the inguinal canal.

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